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Redrafts
Row A
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Webring Info and Other DJ pages
Dear Jane Quilt Blocks
Dear Jane Blocks Page 5

DJ B9

As I begin to construct more and more of this quilt, of course, the blocks become more and more complicated. I chose B9 to work on because it looked like it had less pieces which were larger and easier to manipulate. What I didn't know until after I started work on it was that this block seems to have the largest amount of inset blocks and Y seams possible. I can see it would be a real headache if you sewed it by machine and while I like the William Morris fabrics, I kind of like what Jane used on this block better.

DJ D1

While B9 was challenging in an obvious way, I though D1 would be a piece of cake. I've worked with the narrow, 1/4 " pieces before, but getting them to meet in the center was much more difficult than I had first thought. In fact, this was the first block I actually had to "unsew" to get the center correct. Once done, though, I really like it...I'm just not in a hurry to do another like it!

DJ E9

Another dilemma with the 1/4" pieces is whether to press them together (which you have to do if you are pressing your seams open) or apart, In D1, I pressed together, but it made those narrow strips bow outward. In this one, E9, I pressed outward, towards the blue fabric, which seems to make them wobble more.

DJ J7

J7 is very similar to C12. It's a 9-patch featuring tiny 9-patches. If you were using the same fabric for both blocks, it might make sense to do them both together. Jane seemed to use the 9-patch as a design springboard, just as she used the X-Blocks I have become so fond of.

DJ K2

At first glance K2 is one big checkerboard, but since I was piecing it by hand, I "discovered" that it really is a 9-oatch of 4-patches. If you think you'll have a hard time with the corners, you might want to construct it that way instead of in strips of 6 blocks.

DJ L3

L3 is another "Square in a Square block. In fact, like A4 is an "X block in an x block" this concept helped me figure out the piecing order. The central square with its "court steps log cabin"ish frame was done first, and each corner was pieced as if it were half a log cabin then sewn to the center.

DJ L5

I feel I should call L5 "Fun with Bias Edges" except I really didn't have that much fun constructing it. It's not a terribly difficult block, essentially it ends up being a large 4-patch, but you just have to be really careful with those half-square triangles, even finger pressing can distort the edges.

DJ L1

L1 is a restful block, especially after working on L1. It, too, is, in essence, a 4-patch, and, like L3 and so many others, there's a bit of "Log Cabin" technique thrown in.